jetblackpress:

Tomorrow we embark on a greyhound journey to Wassaic, NY for The Wassaic Project's Annual Summer Festival. We will still be accepting submissions for TOTAL TRASH, the disposable camera zine until 11:59PM. Send up to 5 images to totaltrashzine@gmail.com. 
If you’re in the vicinity of Pittsburgh, PA this Friday around 7pm you should journey over to the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination and check out work from our friends in New Academy Press, titled Investigations in Terraforming.

jetblackpress:

Tomorrow we embark on a greyhound journey to Wassaic, NY for The Wassaic Project's Annual Summer Festival. We will still be accepting submissions for TOTAL TRASH, the disposable camera zine until 11:59PM. Send up to 5 images to totaltrashzine@gmail.com. 

If you’re in the vicinity of Pittsburgh, PA this Friday around 7pm you should journey over to the Irma Freeman Center for Imagination and check out work from our friends in New Academy Press, titled Investigations in Terraforming.

Our bedroom smells like clothes wet with sweat and rain and of flowers slowly dying in a vase, a mishmash of sympathy and sorrow from strangers whose faces I know but whose ideals and ideas I do not agree with. I look down at the ground and shuffle, kick, hum a tune and get along with one arm twisted behind my back and fingers crossed hoping that everything works out for the best. All we have is each other, all I have to feed off of is a smile bounced back from the other side of the counter so I drink my coffee (fancy and local), shrug off the sighs and remind myself that “it’s the little things we do that mean anything,” and try to displace the sadness wrenching at my heart until I can be home with the last glass of wine and the stuffed elephant by my side. 

The photography of William Eggleston

A native Southerner raised on a cotton plantation in the Mississippi Delta, Eggleston has created a singular portrait of his native South since the late 1960s. After discovering photography in the early 1960s, he abandoned a traditional education and instead learned from photographically illustrated books by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Robert Frank. Although he began his career making black-and-white images, he soon abandoned them to experiment with color technology to record experiences in more sensual and accurate terms at a time when color photography was largely confined to commercial advertising. In 1976 with the support of John Szarkowski, the influential photography historian, critic, and curator, Eggleston mounted “Color Photographs” a now famous exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. William Eggleston’s Guide , in which Szarkowski called Eggleston’s photographs “perfect,” accompanied this groundbreaking one-person show that established his reputation as a pioneer of color photography. His subjects were mundane, everyday, often trivial, so that the real subject was seen to be color itself. These images helped establish Eggleston as one of the first non-commercial photographers working in color and inspired a new generation of photographers, as well as filmmakers. 

Eggleston has published his work extensively. He continues to live and work in Memphis, and travels considerably for photographic projects. (x)